Archive - January 2017

How To Pick The Right Water Filter

How To Pick The Right Water Filter

How To Pick The Right Water Filter

Why Treat Water?
Access to clean water is an absolute necessity in life. It’s common knowledge that still water should be avoided when it comes to a drinking water source, but the old adage that “flowing water” is safe to drink can come with heavy consequences if taken literally. While immaculate water sources may appear clean at one juncture – it may be a completely different story somewhere upstream. Because of the sheer uncertainty involved with water sources of all kinds, it’s vital to treat water to ensure that it’s clean and free of harmful microorganisms and pathogens. These Microorganisms stem from human and animal waste and are most commonly spread by rain and run-off into natural water sources.

Harmful microorganisms reproduce at astronomical rates within your body and attack your immune system with a force that only nature can produce. There is no concrete way to know if water is clean by just looking… In the case of treating water, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Common Pathogens Encountered In The Wild:

Bacteria – Bacteria are microscopic living organisms, usually one-celled, that can be found everywhere.
Cholera – An acute intestinal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
Cryptosporidium – One of the most widespread intestinal parasites and a common cause of severe diarrhea. Often found in surface and groundwater sources susceptible to flooding or faecal contamination.
Escherichia coli – Also known as E. coli. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods, such as raw or undercooked ground meat products and raw milk. Sometimes present in water contaminated by fecal matter.
Giardia – Has an outer shell allowing it to survive outside the body for long periods of time and making it tolerant to chlorine disinfection. The parasite is most commonly transmitted by water. It is the most common cause of non-bacterial diarrhea in North America.
Protozoan parasite – Protozoan parasites live in the cells and tissues of other living creatures. Protozoans can cause problems, from targeting the central nervous system to diarrhea.
Salmonella – Salmonella bacterium can live in water for several months. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps.
Shigella – Shigella is one of the leading bacterial causes of diarrhea worldwide. Estimates suggest that Shigella causes approximately 90 million cases of severe dysentery with at least 100,000 of these resulting in death each year.
Viruses – A virus is a small infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of other organisms.

Purifiers vs Filters: What’s The Difference?

At their core, water purifiers and water purifiers are very similar in nature in that they both rid water of impurities through a physical barrier, chemicals or some kind of biological process. However, there are small nuances to each that should directly influence someone who is looking to purchase either a filter or a purifier.

Water Filters:
Water filters generally do not utilize chemicals as a cleansing agent and rely more heavily on physical barriers that filter out harmful bacteria and protozoa. If the water you are treating resides within the United States, water filters are generally enough to rid all bacterial agents and harmful substances that could cause health complications or problems. See the full list of types of water filters below and when they are appropriate for any situation.

Types of Water Filters:

Gravity Water Filters: This filter uses the basic concept of gravity as a way to push water from one reservoir to the other. Simply hang the dirty water container above the clean container and let gravity do the rest. It is best suited for larger groups as it designed to produce a large amount of water.

Mediums Used: The majority of these filters use a Ceramic medium, Products like the Katadyn Base Camp filter utilizes Glass Fiber Pleated Membrane (for outdoor backpacking).

Pros: No pumping, High capacity (produces a large quantity of water), very geasy to use and manageable for people who don’t have a lot of time to wait for filtering process or might be physically impaired.

Cons: Large, not very portable.

Pump Water Filters: Simple and easy to use, this water filter is powered by a pump mechanism. You simply pump in order to transfer water from the water source directly through the filtering device. The results are instantaneous and there is zero wait time with this method of water filtering. If you’re on the go and time is not on your side, this is an extremely wise choice.

Mediums Used: Ceramic (lasts longer and filters up to 13k gallons. The ceramic medium is also easy to clean), Glass Fiber (Flow rate is much higher, however, harder to push through than ceramic. This filters Life cycle is much shorter than the ceramic medium as it only produces 200 gallons of clean water).

Pros: Small, Portable, No Wait Time (Instant Treated Water), Filters out all sediment, Super Clean/Clear Water. Quantity only limited by medium.

Cons: Must be filtered manually, for those with a physical impairment, this may not be the best option.

Water Filter Bottles: This water filtration option is highly portable, light weight and designed for those who are on the go. This style of water filtration unit does not produce a large quantity of clean drinking water. Of all the water filtration devices, this one is the easiest to use and is easy as filling up the water bottle with untreated water to produce clean, drinkable water.

Mediums Used: Glass Fiber Membranes.

Pros: Small and convenient. Easy to use and carry, Does not require physical exertion whatsoever.

Cons: This device is mostly made for personal use as there is only one straw per unit. Compared to other filters, it’s more expensive per gallon to produce clean water and has a limited filtering capacity (up to 26 gallons). Water bottle filters are not made for long term use or large quantities.

Straw Filters: These are the most highly portable water filters out on the market today. On top of only weighing two oz., it’s extremely easy to use. One must simply suck the untreated water in via a straw and then push it back out into a water reservoir using the same straw. This is the ultimate on-the-go personal water filter.

Mediums: Glass Fiber Membranes (Hollow Fiber technology).

Pros: Low Cost, small, light, filters bacteria and protozoa, no chemicals or iodine, only weighs 2 oz.

Cons: Personal use, for smaller groups.

Water Purifiers:
Water filters also rid the water of harmful bacteria, protozoa and pathogens however they generally use a chemical process such as UV light treatment, iodine and chlorine. One thing that water purifiers can do that filters cannot is completely rid water of viruses. This end result is obtained by removing all minerals from the water. One downside to this process of removing all minerals is that it strips essential minerals that your body needs to function properly. Water purifiers should be used when traveling outside of the United States as many common pathogens, bacterial agents and diseases can be found overseas that filters cannot properly treat.
Types of Water Purifiers:

Ultraviolet Water Purifiers: Bacteria cannot live in the presence of ultra violet light. This concept was originally used in large scale water treatment facilities and can now be found in purifiers that fit inside of your pocket. The process itself is chemical but doesn’t use harsh chemicals like chlorine dioxide or iodine. Simply stir the UV pen in a container for 60 seconds in order to treat your drinking water.

Medium: UV Light

Pros: Kills all viruses, small, quick, easy to use, very lightweight and can be used in large groups.

Cons: Uses batteries, electronic (could drop it and break the bulb), doesn’t remove any dirt and sediment (can buy a pre-filter to filter out large items), can only purify one quart at a time (more for personal use or small groups).

Pump Water Purifiers: Pump water purifiers are extremely similar in nature to pump water filters. The only key difference is that the purifier version uses chemicals to rid the treated water of viruses. While iodine is still used, the most common chemical in water purifiers today is Chlorine Dioxide.

Mediums Used: Ceramic (lasts longer and filters up to 13k gallons. The ceramic medium is also easy to clean), Glass Fiber (Flow rate is much higher, however, harder to push through than ceramic. This filters Life cycle is much shorter than the ceramic medium as it only produces 200 gallons of clean water). Uses chemicals… generally Iodine or Chlorine Dioxide.

Pros: Small, Portable, No Wait Time (Instant Treated Water), Filters out all sediment, Super Clean/Clear Water. Quantity only limited by medium.

Cons: Must be filtered manually, for those with a physical impairment, this may not be the best option. Some people don’t like the taste of chemically treated water.

Water Bottle Purifiers: Exactly similar to the water bottle filters, this method of purifying uses the exact same process as filtering, however, it uses chemicals in order to completely rid the treated water of viruses.
Mediums Used: Glass Fiber Membranes and virus killing chemicals (Iodine and Chlorine Dioxide).

Pros: Small and convenient. Easy to use and carry, Does not require physical exertion whatsoever.

Cons: This device is mostly made for personal use as there is only one straw per unit. Compared to other filters, it’s more expensive per gallon to produce clean water and has a limited filtering capacity (up to 26 gallons). Water bottle purifiers are not made for long term use or large quantities.

Chemicals: While many water purifier devices use chemicals as an additional process. Iodine and Chlorine Dioxide can be used in tablet form and dropped into untreated water. It’s a slow process but is guaranteed to rid untreated water of parasites and viruses.

Pros: Very lightweight and small, Carry in pocket or 72 hour kit.

Cons: Doesn’t filter out sediments, Not ready to drink immediately (long wait time), you will need to plan ahead and wont have instant access to clean water. Each chemical has a noticeable different in taste: Iodine you can taste (many companies provide a neutralizer to mask taste), Chlorine you can not taste which is why it is the most common water purifying chemical to date.

Why You Need 30 Days of Food on Hand

Why You Need 30 Days of Food on Hand

Why You Need 30 Days of Food on Hand

When you are new to prepping or even if you are somewhat practiced at it, you are probably still trying to figure out just how much food you should be storing. You will read about folks who have a year’s worth of food sitting in their basement or bunker. It seems like a far-fetched, nearly impossible goal to attain without spending hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars overnight to get that much food stored away. How did they do it? They have probably been at it for a while, years more likely. You can reach that goal by doing a little at a time.

For new preppers, your ultimate goal should be to get at least 30 days worth of food on hand right out of the gate. This is where your focus should be. Food and water will be your priorities assuming you are going to be hunkering down in your home. If you have plans to bug out to a secondary location, you will still want to have a minimum of a 30-day supply in your main home and the bulk of your other supplies in the retreat location.

Why 30 Days?

When you are trying to plan a food storage, it is easiest to work with months. That is one reason. Another reason is the typical fallout from a major disaster will likely leave you holed up in your home for at least a couple of weeks. The government recommends a minimum of 3 days of food and water, but in the grand scheme of things, that is nothing. What if it takes at least a few days before your area can be accessed by rescue services? Will they bring enough food and water? Will there be riots, pushing and shoving as people try to get the minimal supplies that were brought in? It could be another week before adequate supplies are brought into the area or you are able to leave and find food elsewhere. It is simply too risky to leave it up to hoping for the best.

The key is to prepare for the worst while hoping for the best. When you have 30 days of food on hand, you don’t have to spend time and energy trying to take care of that very important need. You can focus on taking care of the injured, finding information about what happened and when you can expect things to be set right again. Things will be tough enough as it is, you don’t need to add to your stress level worrying about where you will find your next meal and what you will feed your children. You need time to get your head on straight and possibly heal from any wounds. If it becomes apparent that the disaster is going to cause a major interruption in the food supply chain for longer than 30 days, you can start scouting for food without panicking that you are not going to be able to eat tomorrow. You have a cushion.

What Food Should You Store?

You need to store food that isn’t going to spoil. Ideally, items with long shelf lives are your best bet. Canned food is often a food of choice for preppers because it can store for years without spoiling and it is inexpensive. However, there is still the risk of it going bad or botulism developing if it hasn’t been stored correctly or the cans have become dented or dinged in any way. Canned food can also be heavy, requiring you to have sturdy shelves to hold a 30-day supply. Another downside to canned food is the salt content in many of the foods. At a time when water is in short supply, you need to manage your salt intake to avoid dehydration.

Freeze-dried food is certainly a favorite for preppers. The variety of meals that are available is astonishing. It requires only a little water to re-hydrate and actually holds quite a bit of flavor. You will find food options like spaghetti and meatballs, chili, chicken soup with veggies and even pork chops! No, the food doesn’t taste exactly as it would should you make it fresh in your kitchen today, but it is pretty close. One suggestion is to have a variety of spices on hand to help add some flavor to the pre-packaged meals.

One of the downsides to the freeze-dried meals is the cost. They can be extremely expensive, especially if you are buying individual packages. However, you can save a great deal of money buy buying in bulk. The foods are regularly sold in 10 pound cans that store for 30 years or more in the right conditions. If you or someone in the family has dietary restrictions, you can find freeze-dried meals that are designed to follow those guidelines, like gluten free, low sodium or even vegetarian options.

It is important you read the serving size details on each can. A 30-day supply for a woman is going to look a lot different than a 30-day supply for a man who is burning thousands of calories every day doing manual labor. Your best option is to focus on calorie content and not pay attention to how long the cans should last you. A single serving is probably not going to be enough for any adult. Factor that in when you are deciding how much to store for 30 days.

BIO – Anthony Urso

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As a firefighter, I see every day how an emergency can affect a family. I strive on helping people with their emergency and survival plans while continuing the course on my own preparedness journey.
You can learn more on our blog http://HomesteadandPrepper.com

What Are the Best Foods for Long-Term Storage?

What Are the Best Foods for Long-Term Storage?

What Are the Best Foods for Long-Term Storage?

Food storage is the foundation of any preparedness plan. For a lot of people, it can be overwhelming. Where do you start? What do you need? Where are you going to put it all?

Fortunately, it’s a lot easier than it sounds. Like any large task, an effective food storage plan is best tackled one step at a time. Your first step, of course, is to decide what food to store. You want to choose food that is cost-effective, nutritious, has a long shelf-life, and that you enjoy eating.

Here are eight types of food that meet those criteria:

Rice

If you want a cheap food that will last almost forever, it’s hard to beat rice. You can pick up a 20 pound bag at any grocery store for around $10, and it has a shelf-life of over 20 years when properly stored. Opt for white rice instead of brown because brown only has a shelf-life of about 6 months.

Beans

Nearly as inexpensive as rice and offering just as long of a shelf-life, beans pack plenty of protein, which would otherwise be tough to find during a crisis. Unlike most other plant-based protein, beans contain provide a source of all nine essential amino acids.

Wheat

You can only store wheat long-term in its original form, which means you also need a grinder to turn it into flour. This isn’t a problem; it just adds one extra step. Proper storage will give you a shelf-life of 20 years or more. You’ll probably have to order it online, but I recommend only buying non-GMO wheat.

Quinoa

Although it looks like a grain, quinoa is actually a seed, and like beans, it provides a complete protein. It has a shorter shelf-life than some of the other foods we’ve covered at about 3 years, but that should be plenty if you practice proper food rotation.

Honey

Scientists have found honey in the ancient pyramids that was still just as tasty and completely safe for consumption as the day the tomb was sealed thousands of years ago. Honey is a rich source of calories and a versatile sweetener with an unlimited shelf-life.

Sugar

Like honey, sugar has an unlimited shelf-life, plus it’s cheap and easy to store.

Freeze-Dried Food

The biggest benefit of freeze-dried food is the convenience. Each case contains a variety of meals, and nowadays, you can easily find products that meet almost any dietary restriction, such as vegetarian, gluten-free, or paleo. Preparation is as simple as adding hot water, and the shelf-life is around 25 years.

Canned Food

Canned food is another great option because as long as the seal is not damaged, it will remain safe to eat indefinitely. It’s relatively inexpensive and very convenient—all you need is a can opener to enjoy a meal. The only thing you need to look out for is BPA-lined cans.

Storage

A cool, dry location is best for storage, which means your garage is out of the question. You’re probably thinking that doesn’t leave you with much space, but here are a few places you can store food in almost any home:

• under beds
• behind bookshelves
• behind entertainment centers
• inside the cold air return
• in a basement
• under the stairs
• inside an ottoman
• inside closets
• utility rooms

No matter where you store your food, it’s important to rotate it as it’s eaten so that you always have a fresh supply on hand.

Ideally, you should seal your food in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers, and if possible, seal those bags in food-grade 5-gallon buckets. This will ensure the maximum shelf-life of your food.

About the Author

Jeremy Knauff is a Marine Corps infantry veteran and the founder of How To Survive It, where he shares survival, prepping, and self-defense tips.
http://howtosurviveit.com/

Water Quality

Clean Water

The World Health Organization (WHO) attributes 80% of all travel diseases to contaminated drinking water. Don’t let contaminated drinking water spoil your trip. Avoid tap water and ice cubes anytime the water quality is uncertain – even bottled water can be questionable, when available. According to WHO, almost half of all travellers suffer from some form of diarrhoea while en-route.

Good health while travelling starts with travel preparation – and the right Katadyn product for safe drinking water.

Examining the Optimal 72 Hour Kit Contents

72 hour kits

Without a moments notice situations can change quite dramatically. This is why it is essential that you prepare for a serious emergency and stay prepared at all times. The bottom line is that you need a collection of essential items just in case an emergency occurs. Choosing the right 72 hour kit contents could literally mean the difference between life and death.

Many people don’t want to prepare for emergency situations, as they feel that it means that they are thinking in a “negative manner.” But nothing could be further from the truth. Preparing for an emergency isn’t just logical, but is also just commonsense. For example, a wide array of weather conditions, power grid issues or a random problem with your home could all put you in an emergency situation. In this article we will review what you need to have on hand so that you can deal with an emergency if it comes your way.

Your 72 Hour Kit Contents

First, it is important to realize that you’ll need to address all of your own food, water, security, survival and sanitation needs if a serious emergency were to arise. Experts recommend that you have enough supplies to last about 72 hours.

72 hours might not sound like a lot of time. But when you are supplying all of your needs, it quickly becomes evident that this actually is a considerable amount of time. You’ll need enough food to last 72 hours per person. This requirement might sound like a “piece of cake” until you remember that in order to stay prepared your food has to be non-perishable and not require refrigeration.

Good Food Choices ( 3 Day Supply of Non-Perishable Food)

-Dried fruit
-Jerky
-Nuts
-Seeds
-Nut and/or seed butters
-Energy bars
-Energy powders
-Applesauce
-A can opener

Water

-Allot for 1 gallon of water, per person, per day

Lighting Essentials

-Flashlight
-Extra batteries
-Flares
-Cigarette lighter
-Candles

Personal Care Essentials

-First aid kit
-Prescription medications
-Toilet paper
-Soap
-Hand sanitizer

Clothing Essentials

-Blankets
-Change of clothing for everyone in your group/family
-Rain coats
-Snow boots
-Extra socks

Special Supplies for Infants/Toddlers

-Formula
-Baby food
-Snacks
-Cups
-Toys

Miscellaneous 72 Hour Kit Contents

-Battery powered radio
-Cellphone
-Cellphone charger
-Maps
-Separate GPS device
-Plastic sheeting
-Cash
-Traveler’s checks
-Important family documents
-Pen, paper and notepad
-Compass
-Pocket knife

Monitor Your 72 Hour Kit Contents Periodically

Regularly check all of your food and other goods and make certain that everything is up to date. We advise doing this approximately every 6 months. Otherwise, time can slip away and you can forget all about your 72 hour kit and whether or not it is in optimal shape. It is critical that you make sure that your food has not expired and that you replace your water with newer water containers from time to time. Also make sure that all your important documents have not expired.

Preparing for an emergency is in no way the same thing as expecting one. Just because you are prepared for an emergency doesn’t mean that one will come your way. Having enough supplies for 72 hours will give you peace of mind. That fact alone is enough to make it worth all the effort!

Home Preparedness Checklist

Home preparedness Checklist

EARTHQUAKE  TORNADO  HURRICANE  WINTER STORMS  FIRE  FLASH FLOOD

Emergency Preparedness Checklist

What to Include in a ‘Bug-Out’ Kit

The checklist below is intended to be a starting point for building your own 72hr ‘Bug-Out’ kit and is not intended to be all-inclusive. You may think of additional items you want to include. We offer a separate Home Emergency Preparedness Checklist for supplies to have-on-hand at home that you can to download to assist you.
Be sure to keep your kit as light as possible, preferably under 25 lbs. Can be built for 1 or 2 persons (adjust supplies accordingly).

WATER
Be careful. Weight adds quickly here.
☐ Lifeboat water pouches–5yr SL
Recommend 4 per day (12 p/p)
☐ *Personal water filtering bottle
☐ *Chlorine dioxide purifying tablets
☐ *Extra water (to carry)
FOOD
We recommend only non-thirst provoking food
rations that are not affected by heat or freezing.
☐ 3600 calorie Mainstay, Datrex or
Millennium food bars p/p
☐ *Granola bars, jerky, trail mix, etc.
☐ *Freeze-dried meals
☐ *Cereals, powdered soups,
powdered drink mix
(extra water req’d to eat/digest)
☐ *Plastic plate, cup & utensils
FIRST AID SUPPLIES
☐ Knucklemender™ first aid kit with
first aid manual
☐ N95 Surgical/dust masks
☐ Chap lip stick
☐ *Sun, insect repellant wipes
WARMTH, HEAT & COOKING
☐ Emergency space blanket
☐ Lightweight bivy sleeping bag
☐ Emergency poncho
☐ Hand & body warmers (6)
☐ Water/wind proof matches
☐ Disposable butane lighter
☐ Tube tent shelter
☐ *Folding lightweight stove & fuel
☐ *Baseball/knit cap
MONEY/CASH
☐ $20-$100 cash in small bills. Checks
& Credit cards may be useless.
MORALE BOOSTERS
☐ Playing cards, small games
☐ Chewing gum
☐ Hard candy drops
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
☐ Lightweight jacket
☐ Personal protection device(s)
☐ *Sturdy comfy shoes
☐ *Extra underwear set

LIGHT SOURCES
☐ 36hr candle
☐ LED flashlight & spare batteries
☐ Instant 12hr lightsticks (2-3)
☐ *LED Headlamp
COMMUNICATION
☐ Solar/crank/battery am/fm/noaa
weather radio
☐ Camping whistle w/lanyard
☐ Pen, pencil, paper, notepad
☐ Spare batteries (all devices)
☐ Important phone # in/out of town
☐ *Solar/crank cell phone charger
HYGIENE/TOILETRIES
☐ Alcohol hand sanitizer/wipes (12)
☐ Roll of toilet tissue
☐ Compact facial tissue (2)
☐ Nitrile exam gloves (2pr)
☐ Sanitation toilet bag liner
☐ *Small wash towel
☐ *Toothbrush, paste, comb, razor
☐ *Feminine hygiene supplies
☐ *Compact baby wipes
☐ *Concentrated camp soap (sm)
☐ *Contact lens solution
TOOLS/MISC
☐ Multi-function tool w/can opener
☐ Mini sew kit
☐ 50’-100’ nylon paracord/rope
☐ Duct tape (mini roll)
☐ Leather palm gloves
☐ 3mil garbage bag
☐ Plastic shovel/trowel
☐ *Compass/local map of area
☐ *Safety goggles/sun glasses
SPECIAL NEEDS
☐ Personal medications needed
☐ Copy of doctor prescriptions
☐ *Baby formula, cereal, diapers,
baby wipes
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
☐ Quality backpack for your gear
☐ Spare car/home keys
☐ Copy of passport & driver’s license
☐ Stress reliever games/cards

Nitro-Pak® Preparedness Center, Inc  “America’s Foremost Emergency Food & Gear Company”™
1.800.866.4876  www.nitro-pak.com
Permission granted to copy this checklist for non-commercial use with credits included. ©2014 Nitro-Pak®

checklist

Vehicle Emergency Preparedness Checklist

Vehicle Preparedness Check list

EARTHQUAKE  TORNADO  HURRICANE  WINTER STORMS  FIRE  FLASH FLOOD

Vehicle Emergency
Preparedness Checklist

Basic List of Supplies to Keep in Your Vehicle—

The checklist below is for supplies you might want to keep in your vehicle…’just-in-case’ and is not ment to be all-inclusive. You may think of additional items you want to include. We offer a separate Emergency Preparedness Checklist for Building a 72hr ‘Bug-Out’ Kit and a Home Emergency Preparedness Checklist you can download also to assist in putting together your preparedness supplies.
The critical key to any preparedness plan is to DO IT NOW before you need it. Be Safe…Be Prepared!

FLAT TIRE
AAA Autoclub Membership works good here. Be sure to check spare tire air pressure at least once per year.

AAA Autoclub Membership works good here. Be sure to check spare tire air pressure at least once per year.
☐ Check to be sure your vehicle has the original factory tire jack and tire nut wrench. These are bare minimum. We suggest upgrading to a hydraulic jack with solid steel lug nut tool to fit your specific tire lugs.
☐ 12v plug-in car tire air compressor
☐ Slime/Fix-A-Flat tire inflator can.
(Slime® offers a 12v 7-Min. Flat Tire Repair System or deluxe 48pc all-in-one kit that has both of the above.)
☐ *12v electric lug nut tool

GENERAL MISC ITEMS
☐ ALWAYS keep a minimum of a ½
tank of gas in your car
☐ Plastic tote storage container
☐ HD 4-6 gauge 16-20ft battery
jumper cables
☐ Reflectors & flares to place behind
the vehicle on the road
☐ Spare set of hidden car keys
☐ Leather gloves/garden gloves
☐ Nitrile surgical gloves
☐ Assorted screw drivers, pliers,
adjustable wrench, multi-tool knife
☐ HD tow strap/rope/chain
☐ Various bungee cords
☐ Quart of oil (see owner’s manual)
☐ Roll of reinforced duct tape
☐ Roll of electrical tape
☐ Assorted 12v car fuses (see car’s
owner’s manual for correct type)
☐ Tire pressure gauge
☐ Multi- LED task flashlight (reverse
batteries for storage)
☐ Extra batteries (flashlight, radio, etc)
☐ Break-off blade utility knife
☐ Empty collapsible gas carrier
☐ 2.5 – 5lb ABC fire extinguisher
☐ Tri-folding metal shovel
☐ Small roll of metal wire
☐ Assortment of zip ties
☐ Roll of shop/paper towels
☐ Hand sanitizer wipes/pump
☐ Funnel (oil/gas)
☐ Siphon gas hose
☐ *Cloth garage towels

WINTER STORMS (stuck/slipping)
Be sure to have a compact 72hr kit that includes food, water and first-aid. See list shown at end.
☐ Windshield snow/ice scraper
☐ Tire traction metal/plastic matts
☐ Tyre-Grip® traction spray
☐ Tire chains to fit your size tire

72HR EMERGENCY SUPPLIES
☐ Backpack carrying bag
☐ Emergency food bars
☐ Granola bars, jerky, trail mix, etc.
☐ Hard candy
☐ Bottled water (6+)
☐ Mid-size first aid kit w/manual
☐ AM/FM/NOAA radio w/batteries
☐ 3mil construction trash bags
☐ Rain poncho
☐ Hand and body warmers
☐ Instant lightsticks
☐ Survival whistle with lanyard
☐ Pen, pencil, paper, notepad
☐ Felt tip pen marker
☐ Card stock 8×11” printed w/”HELP”
☐ Toilet paper roll in re-sealing bag
☐ Waterproof matches
☐ Disposable butane lighter
☐ 50-100’ nylon paracord/rope
☐ Space emergency blankets
☐ Liquid filled compass
☐ *Small games, playing cards
☐ *Wool utility blanket
☐ *Cell phone charger
☐ *Water Filter Bottle/Straw
☐ *Cash $20-50 in small bills
☐ __________________________
*Optional items

Nitro-Pak® Preparedness Center, Inc  “America’s Foremost Emergency Food & Gear Company”™
1.800.866.4876  www.nitro-pak.com
Permission granted to copy this checklist for non-commercial use with credits included. ©2014 Nitro-Pak®

checklist


72 Hour Emergency Checklist

72 hour check list

EARTHQUAKE  TORNADO  HURRICANE  WINTER STORMS  FIRE  FLASH FLOOD

Emergency Preparedness Checklist

What to Include in a ‘Bug-Out’ Kit

The checklist below is intended to be a starting point for building your own 72hr ‘Bug-Out’ kit and is not intended to be all-inclusive. You may think of additional items you want to include. We offer a separate Home Emergency Preparedness Checklist for supplies to have-on-hand at home that you can to download to assist you.
Be sure to keep your kit as light as possible, preferably under 25 lbs. Can be built for 1 or 2 persons (adjust supplies accordingly).

WATER
Be careful. Weight adds quickly here.
☐ Lifeboat water pouches–5yr SL
Recommend 4 per day (12 p/p)
☐ *Personal water filtering bottle
☐ *Chlorine dioxide purifying tablets
☐ *Extra water (to carry)
FOOD
We recommend only non-thirst provoking food
rations that are not affected by heat or freezing.
☐ 3600 calorie Mainstay, Datrex or
Millennium food bars p/p
☐ *Granola bars, jerky, trail mix, etc.
☐ *Freeze-dried meals
☐ *Cereals, powdered soups,
powdered drink mix
(extra water req’d to eat/digest)
☐ *Plastic plate, cup & utensils
FIRST AID SUPPLIES
☐ Knucklemender™ first aid kit with
first aid manual
☐ N95 Surgical/dust masks
☐ Chap lip stick
☐ *Sun, insect repellant wipes
WARMTH, HEAT & COOKING
☐ Emergency space blanket
☐ Lightweight bivy sleeping bag
☐ Emergency poncho
☐ Hand & body warmers (6)
☐ Water/wind proof matches
☐ Disposable butane lighter
☐ Tube tent shelter
☐ *Folding lightweight stove & fuel
☐ *Baseball/knit cap
MONEY/CASH
☐ $20-$100 cash in small bills. Checks
& Credit cards may be useless.
MORALE BOOSTERS
☐ Playing cards, small games
☐ Chewing gum
☐ Hard candy drops
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
☐ Lightweight jacket
☐ Personal protection device(s)
☐ *Sturdy comfy shoes
☐ *Extra underwear set

LIGHT SOURCES
☐ 36hr candle
☐ LED flashlight & spare batteries
☐ Instant 12hr lightsticks (2-3)
☐ *LED Headlamp
COMMUNICATION
☐ Solar/crank/battery am/fm/noaa
weather radio
☐ Camping whistle w/lanyard
☐ Pen, pencil, paper, notepad
☐ Spare batteries (all devices)
☐ Important phone # in/out of town
☐ *Solar/crank cell phone charger
HYGIENE/TOILETRIES
☐ Alcohol hand sanitizer/wipes (12)
☐ Roll of toilet tissue
☐ Compact facial tissue (2)
☐ Nitrile exam gloves (2pr)
☐ Sanitation toilet bag liner
☐ *Small wash towel
☐ *Toothbrush, paste, comb, razor
☐ *Feminine hygiene supplies
☐ *Compact baby wipes
☐ *Concentrated camp soap (sm)
☐ *Contact lens solution
TOOLS/MISC
☐ Multi-function tool w/can opener
☐ Mini sew kit
☐ 50’-100’ nylon paracord/rope
☐ Duct tape (mini roll)
☐ Leather palm gloves
☐ 3mil garbage bag
☐ Plastic shovel/trowel
☐ *Compass/local map of area
☐ *Safety goggles/sun glasses
SPECIAL NEEDS
☐ Personal medications needed
☐ Copy of doctor prescriptions
☐ *Baby formula, cereal, diapers,
baby wipes
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
☐ Quality backpack for your gear
☐ Spare car/home keys
☐ Copy of passport & driver’s license
☐ Stress reliever games/cards

Nitro-Pak® Preparedness Center, Inc  “America’s Foremost Emergency Food & Gear Company”™
1.800.866.4876  www.nitro-pak.com
Permission granted to copy this checklist for non-commercial use with credits included. ©2014 Nitro-Pak®

checklist

How Long Can Freeze-Dried and Dehydrated Canned Products Last Once Opened?

Food Storage

How Long Can Freeze-Dried and Dehydrated Canned Products Last Once Opened?

 

Most food products have a recommended “once opened, use by…” time-frame.  For example, each can of Mountain House food states:

“Once open, contents should be used immediately.  However, product resealed using plastic recloseable lid has been found to be acceptable up to one week after opening.” 

Since manufacturers want you to be pleased with your product every time you use it, they will often give a much shorter time-frame than the product can actually last.  This means that while the product will have the best flavor and nutrition within the given time-frame, the food can still provide you with a great meal long after the fact.

The question of how much longer a food can last depends on a number of variables.  While there isn’t a set period of time that we can recommend for you to use your product, there are some guidelines we can offer to help you get the most out of your investment.

The thing to remember is, if something can harm a product while it’s being stored, it can harm it after it’s been opened.  Our main concerns are then:

  • Heat
  • Oxygen
  • Moisture
  • Light

Heat:  Heat can quickly breakdown a food’s vitamin and protein content.  To maintain a high level of nutrition, it is still best to store opened food in as cool an environment as possible, preferably 70 º or lower.  If you still have electricity, storing remaining food in the fridge or freezer is a great way of preserving your reserve.   Just be sure to store it in airtight and moisture proof containers.

Oxygen and Moisture:  Oxygen and moisture can usually be avoided at the same time.  Since freeze-dried and dehydrated food has already gone through a process to remove moisture, our main concern is the moisture in the air.  By immediately storing your opened food in airtight containers, you can reduce the affects of oxygen and moisture at the same time.   Each can does come with its own resealing lid, but it is far more effective to store the unused portion in something like a Ziplock bag before placing it back into the can.

Light:  Light is probably one of the least thought of dangers to our stored food; however, light can degrade components in our foods, such as vitamins, proteins and fats.  They can also cause the color and flavor of the food to change.  If you are storing your opened food in clear bags or containers, placing the containers in a cupboard or dark pantry would help the food keep long

Other factors to consider are how your products were stored and what condition your can is in.  If your products were stored under less than ideal circumstances, the food inside may have already degraded to a certain extent.  Also, if there are any significant dents along the seams of the can, there may be cracks that have let in air and moisture.  These will significantly decrease the amount of time an opened product will remain good to use, no matter how well you store your products later.

By continuing to treat your opened food reserves with the same care as you did while storing them, you can continue to enjoy great meals for potentially months to come.  We here at Nitro-Pak have seen first-hand Mountain House products last four months and longer and still have a great taste.  Just remember to treat any prepared meals like you would normal leftovers.

 

 

How to Survive a Hurricane

How to survive a hurricane

How to Survive a Hurricane

With the arrival of each hurricane season people living along the coasts brace themselves for the potential big one. Some have lived through more than one big hurricane, vestiges of the disasters still standing as vivid memories. As news reports track the path and intensity of each season’s storms, coastal residents watch trying to decide whether to shelter in place or take their family and go. Numerous considerations will shape those decisions within an overarching framework of the family’s safety.

Sheltering in Place
Staying put is usually the best strategy. It’s the best strategy if your home is not in a flood zone and can withstand the high winds of the approaching storm. First, consult storm surge hazard maps to determine if you are safely outside of inundation areas. Familiarize yourself with the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale to help assess the structural limits of your own home. Even the 98-110 mph winds of a category 2 hurricane can strip the roofs of well-constructed houses. Boarding up windows and reinforcing exterior doors against winds and debris will help your home weather the storm.

Once the safety of the shelter itself, your home, is sound move on to the other emergency essentials;

Water
A clean supply of drinkable water during, and the lingering days after, any given disaster is vital. Flood waters can contaminate drinking water systems and render water treatment facilities inoperable. Stockpile enough water for each family member for a minimum of 3 days but given the lasting effects of past hurricanes storing away a week’s supply or more would not be unwarranted. A gallon for each person, per day is a good rule of thumb to follow. As a contingency, make sure you’re able to boil water from other sources and invest in a quality water filter.

Food
Today’s range of food types and preservation methods is wide but for planning purposes base your stockpile quantities on individual caloric needs. For the average, moderately active person between the ages of 14-40, 2,000-2,800 calories a daily is sufficient. While dry goods and canned or dehydrated foods are viable options, freeze-dried prepackaged meals may be the easiest, longest lasting of the emergency food choices. Stored at 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit in a dark, dry place individual freeze-dried meal packets have shelf lives of 5-10 years.

Power
When we talk power, we mean electrical power. The job of supplying this power falls to emergency generators, of which there are two main types, the portable gasoline-powered type and the permanent standby model. If there is a need is for only a few lights, and perhaps a couple of fans and a refrigerator a portable and less expensive type will suffice. However, if power needs are greater — for instance a well pump, a freezer or an air conditioner — a standby generator, fueled by propane or natural gas and starts automatically when the power goes off is a more effective option.

Evacuation
Evacuating or bugging-out is the strategy if staying home is simply not an option, the danger is too great. Whether the choice is to head for the nearest evacuation center or to get as far from the storm as possible before it makes landfall, plan the route you will take including alternate routes. Each member of the family will also needs a bug-out bag. The must-haves for each bag include;
• Enough food and water for at least 3 days
• A well equipped medical kit to treat and manage a range of illnesses, pain, injuries and prevent infections, making sure to include regularly needed prescription medications and other items (contact lenses, eyeglasses, hearing aids, syringes, EpiPens)
• Comfortable clothing, waterproof layers and sturdy footwear.
• Flashlights, local area maps, radio to stay apprised of response efforts.

References:
http://www.epa.gov/hurricanes/
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshws.php
http://www.state.nj.us/njoem/plan/prot-act-shelter.html
http://noaa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/StorytellingTextLegend/index.html?appid=b1a20ab5eec149058bafc059635a82ee
http://www.ready.gov/evacuating-yourself-and-your-family
http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/health/case_studies/hurricane_Katrina.html